Skip to main content

About this collection

The National Bureau of Standards’ (NBS) interest in cryogenics (the production of very low temperatures and the properties of materials at those temperatures) dates back to 1904, when a plant for making and maintaining liquid and solid hydrogen, the invention of British physicist James Dewar, was exhibited at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis. The images in the Cryogenics Photographic Collection document experiments and equipment from the 1930s to the late 1950s. Over a period of eight years NBS made a series of cryogenic studies focused on the normal hydrogen molecule, and two isotopes: hydrogen deuteride and deuterium under a wide range of pressures. The final report on these studies by H.W. Woolley, Russell B. Scott and Ferdinand G. Brickwedde became a classic and established NBS as the Federal expert on cryogenic engineering. [From: Measures for Progress, by R. C. Cochrane, p. 471]

 

BROWSE THIS COLLECTION

 

 
Select the collections to add or remove from your search
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
 
OK