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In the late 1930s Harry Diamond, Wilbur Hinman, and Francis Dunmore undertook research to devise a practical system of radiometeorography for the Navy’s Bureau of Aeronautics.  A year after beginning construction of their unit, Diamond and his group sent up their first model radiosonde and demonstrated its effectiveness in transmitting continuous data on cloud height and thickness, temperature, pressure, humidity, and light intensity in the upper atmosphere.  Effective from ground level to heights of 15 or more miles and at distances up to 200 miles, the radiosonde enormously increased the range and quantity of weather data previously gathered by observing devices strapped to kites, zeppelins, or the wings of airplanes. [From: Measures for Progress by R. C. Cochrane, p. 353]

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